I had the pleasure to interview Ian Brodie for my monthly article at The National Networker. Ian’s a UK-based marketing consultant whose known for his expertise at helping professionals develop clients and the revenues they offer.

Ian shared his thoughts about the challenge of keeping in touch with people you meet.  Here’s what he shared about WHY this is so and HOW to address it:

CONTRIBUTING FACTORS:
“There are  several reasons this is a challenge for  so many, but they seem to stem from a feeling that we have “No Time” or “No Staff” to do it.  In reality, what’s more likely is that we have NO SYSTEM for Staying-in-Touch with our prospects, clients and ‘fans’ — people who are supporters of our business or practice”

CORRECTIVE ACTIONS:
In the article, Ian shares two great (and, do-able!) ideas:

Top 10 List:
This an easy way to follow-up.  Just pick 10 people of interest to your business and list them where you’ll see them often on a daily basis. Make note of their interests, challenges, desired connections, etc.  As you review this information throughout the day, you’ll be amazed at how many opportunities you’ll notice to add value to someone you know and build goodwill between you at the same time.

Use CRM software:
this helps you automate a series of planned contacts with someone of interest to you and your business.  As your list of ‘key people’ grows, it’s impractical to manage manually.  That’s why CRM software is so helpful.  Ian pointed out two opportunities to use CRM effectively.  “Initially, be sure you follow-up with someone quickly — an email or note with something of value to the other person is ideal. Then, over time, plan a series of periodic contacts — email, phone, post that remind them of you and invite them to respond to useful information you have to offer.”

KEY POINT:
Nurturing relationships is important.  Many people don’t do it because they have NO SYSTEM to do so.  If you’re serious about staying-in-touch with people for your business, use a CRM software to make important contacts happen . . . by design, not accident.